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CelierAviation
10-15-2012, 10:03 AM
Why the Xenon Gyro is the safest and best ultralight aircraft?

http://gyroplanes.pl/CONTACT_files/Xenon%20IV%20only.png

The Cabin of the Xenon is an engineering work of art - is made of composite materials in monocoque technology which means that it is structurally built in one piece of material, just like Formula 1 cars.


What is a monocoque?


The Cabin is the main component of the machine. All the other components are mounted around the cabin. The main task of the cabin is to provide an enormously strong shell shape where by all other parts are fixed. This provides a huge safety for pilot in the event of an accident because the cabin is capable of withstanding the load many times exceeding the acceleration of gravity.

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/shapeimage_14.png


Monocoque generally means a structure in which the forces are transmitted through the fuselage instead of rods and tubes or frame.

Our Xenon is one of the few in the world that uses a monocoque. In the most competitive construction it is done separately from steel or aluminum frame to which are affixed all the shell elements.


Our cabin is also equipped with a controlled crumple zones. The most important is nose of the cabin, which in the event of a collision with an obstacle absorbs all the energy to protect the legs and the body of the pilot. Another important crumple zone is the wall separating the cockpit from the Bulkhead engine area. It is a spatial structure reinforced with composite profiles.

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/Xenon%20POGLADOWe.png


Very important parts of the cabin structure are the "the ribs" as they have created an interesting safety feature. Raphael Celier is very keen observer, who likes to include features from nature in his design constructions. Another common practice of modern engineering is a technology we all know named "honey comb". This is reproduced in industry which is extremely sturdy. Again this is found in our construction of the Xenon. Similarly, a blade of grass or spider thread are carefully studied by scientists who try to imitate their strength and properties, and apply them to modern designs and technologies.


Raphael is also a fan of cinema and if you go back a few years we all admired the Jurasic Park and its computer-animated giant dinosaurs, when we experienced adventure with the heroes of the film, Raphael observed how the huge animals as they could move quickly. The result of these observations and thoughts is ... Xenon cabin mimic extremely durable the ribs the Tyranozaurus Rex.

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/tyrannosaurus-rex-skeleton-model_635.jpg

The moment where theory meets practice are the strength tests. Celier Aviation together with the Institute of Aviation the Technical University of Warsaw conducted a comprehensive study of the strength of the cabin and the rest of the components. This confirmed the expected strength and to everyone's surprise award exceeded the expected standards.


Our cabin is the result of hundreds of hours spent on analysis, testing and verification of the concept in practice. Xenon cabin was built with a view to host large pilots. The constructor has given a priority for tall men and women to feel comfortable in the Xenon. Ergonomics and ease of use combined with ultra-modern solution technique is the main secret of Xenon.

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/Rozkad%20mas%20skupionych.jpg

Take for example the seat that is made from carbon composite and foam-filled cevlar. This is able to save our spine in a accident. The seats can also "crumple".


In the process of design, sketches and drawings are transferred to a computer with a modern CAD software, this technology it is possible to place the phantom in the middle of the draft and check the ergonomics of the machine before manufacturing a prototype.


Looking at the finished design you will not realize that virtually nothing was left to chance and every item is the result of many hours spent on the project.

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/siatka_caosc.jpg

The Mast is a vital part of the structure of our Xenon. During the design process, engineers have to reconcile some seemingly contradictory elements of the equation.

The main objective was to create a flying machine as the safest flying vehicle you can imagine.

The mast must be very sturdy because from it hangs the entire structure of the Gyrocopter and at the same time there must be a safety zone to avoid serious injury in the case an unexpected collision of the rotor with an obstacle. Based on the assumptions and structural stress tests we developed a profile that is able to reconcile the seemingly contradictory task.With the fulfillment of construction we can withstand overload mast stresses of several G and yet again it a specially designed "crumple zone"

The mast is designed so that in the event of an accident spinning rotor separated from the cab and injured the pilot. What an peace of mind for us!

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/Nowa%20kabina_do%20frezowania9.jpg


The Chassis is simple design and connects the wheels and cabin, seemingly nothing special. It is also the fruit of calculations, tests of strength and priority objectives designed to maintain the security of both active and passive.

Xenon chassis is extremely wide - his spacing unparalleled in other Gyrocopters.

Its dimensions are above 2.20 m so that during taxiing and landing it is stable and predictable. Also the shape of the landing gear is not random, slightly gaping letter L is designed to absorb energy in the event of a sudden touchdown and save your body from damage.

http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech_files/droppedImage.jpg

Read more: http://gyroplanes.pl/Xenons_tech.html

RotoPlane
10-15-2012, 10:30 AM
You failed to mention your twin tail-boom design. It allows the prop thrustline to be lower than would possible if a keel structure was used and thus reduces the distance between this thrustline and the CG location.

A Magi and its clones would be better aircraft if such a twin tail structure was used in their design.

Master Roda
10-15-2012, 10:44 AM
Does this design differ from the Zen1? If so, what exactly would that be?

Gyro_Kai
10-15-2012, 10:45 AM
Ed, I don't agree on your assessment. The keel below the prop adds another 2" of ground clearance to the prop and can be scraped without the prop touching the ground. The tail-wheels of the Xenon tail-booms keep the prop at a similar, if not higher distance.

Kai.

PTKay
10-15-2012, 10:55 AM
...
The mast is designed so that in the event of an accident spinning rotor separated from the cab and injured the pilot. What an peace of mind for us!
...
I hope this is not what you intended to write.

BTW: very nice CAD drawings.
When do you expect to manufacture the first flying prototype?

RotoPlane
10-15-2012, 11:31 AM
Ed, I don't agree on your assessment. The keel below the prop adds another 2" of ground clearance to the prop and can be scraped without the prop touching the ground. The tail-wheels of the Xenon tail-booms keep the prop at a similar, if not higher distance.

Kai.

Hi Kai,
My first tail design used a keel and it forced the 72" prop center line position to be located almost 6" above the CG.

By using the twin tail-booms, I was able to lower the thrustline to the same level as the CG....with sufficient clearance between the ground and the prop tips.
In my opinion, this change made my aircraft a better and safer design than it originally was....

CelierAviation
10-25-2012, 12:41 AM
Crashed gyro pilot keen to fly again...

http://www.sunlive.co.nz/news/33767-crashed-gyro-pilot-keen-to-fly-again.html

http://www.sunlive.co.nz/assets/images/site/121025_Gyrocopter_Thursday.jpg

The pilot of the gyrocopter that crash landed in Tauranga Harbour yesterday would go flying again today - if he could.
David Church, 64, and his 65-year-old friend managed to walk away from the wreckage after the gyrocopter lost power and plunged 500feet into shallow waters off the end of a Tauranga Airport runway.

http://www.sunlive.co.nz/assets/images/site/Gyrocrash5.jpg

David says he was aware of a problem on board shortly after take-off, and was attempting to return to the nearby airport when he was forced to make an emergency landing.
“I made a little misjudgement I suppose, a number of circumstances came into it without getting too technical,” says David.
“The best thing that ever happened was I recognised that I had an issue, and I controlled the aircraft and landed it as well as I possibly could, and I think that’s what saved our lives.”
Both men survived the landing unscathed and were able to wade the 200 metres to shore where they were greeted by arriving emergency services at about 1.30pm on Wednesday.
Firefighters from Tauranga and Mount Maunganui were called to the airport, along with an airport crash crew and St John Ambulance from Te Puke.
A 65-year-old man from Gate Pa was taken to Tauranga Hospital as a precaution.
The light aircraft wreckage is still being assessed for possible repairs after the remains were fished out of Waipu Bay near Te Ngaiopapapa Point by helicopter on Wednesday.
David says he has undertaken a forced landing in training, but that was the first real emergency in the 250 hours he’s spent flying his gyrocopter in the last three years.
“The experience served me well,” says David.
“You could say I was excited because I did it properly. That’s the main thing in the end - if you survive an air crash that’s the main thing isn’t it.”
The aircraft is probably salvageable, says David, it just depends whether he’s prepared to fix it or not.
The main rotor snapped off, as it was designed to, protecting the pilot and passenger.


http://www.sunlive.co.nz/assets/images/site/121024-Gyrocopter-crash.jpg

David says the passenger shell and engine have been washed down with fresh water.
“It hasn’t put me off flying at all - you get back on the horse. I would go up now and have a fly.”
The wreckage is being inspected at Solo Wings, at Tauranga Airport.
Engineer and director Colin Alexander says David Church did and exceptionally good job carrying out the forced landing, with most of the damaged suffered when the aircraft was lifted from the harbour by helicopter.
The main rotor is damaged, and there are some minor fibreglass repairs required on the fuselage. The engine is fine.

http://www.sunlive.co.nz/assets/images/site/121025_Gyrocopter_Thursday.jpg

It is the second gyrocopter crash in Tauranga this year.
At about 4pm on June 17 a gyrocopter plunged into the sea on the harbour side of Matakana Island.
The two men on board escaped the wreckage and swam to the surface before being taken to Sulphur Point Marina aboard an inflatable boat.
Both were uninjured.

http://www.sunlive.co.nz/assets/images/site/121025_Gyrocopter_Thursday-1243-004.jpg

Fly Army
10-25-2012, 06:09 AM
Too bad they don't make a bigger engine for it. I'd really like to see what this aircraft would be like with a lightweight 150hp engine. Rotax needs to expand their line-up a bit.

Master Roda
10-25-2012, 12:06 PM
The mast is designed so that in the event of an accident spinning rotor separated from the cab and injured the pilot. What an peace of mind for us!




The main rotor snapped off, as it was designed to, protecting the pilot and passenger.



This design philosophy is divergent of every design I have ever heard of.
We try very hard to make things strong and stay with the aircraft.
Historically when a mast fails the rotors will "walk" through the cabin and kill the occupants,.....not "save" them.
Throwing a rotor from the aircraft may unintentionally strike innocent people standing near. Also, throwing a rotor will send the head out of balance and rip it off of the mast. This would not be good in flight no matter the altitude.

I don't see how either of your "safety" features are safe nor how you can design them. Rather it seems like an excuse as to why they break.
Can you explain how I may be wrong or what I seem to be missing?

Steve_UK
10-25-2012, 12:18 PM
This particular Xenon has now had two broken masts - a unique machine ?

RotoPlane
10-25-2012, 06:20 PM
I can think of no positive reasons to want a mast and rotor vacating my airframe, so I agree with what Jon said.

Plus I want my mast to act as a roll-bar if the horizon flips while on the ground.

birdy
10-25-2012, 07:23 PM
Too bad they don't make a bigger engine for it.
The 914 is plenty big enuf Flyarmy, its the opperater that dont seem to have enuf. :(
Iv driven one of these machines, in not so faverable DA, with the [fat] owner sitn alongside, and it had plenty in reserve.

twistair
10-25-2012, 07:46 PM
This design philosophy is divergent of every design I have ever heard of.
We try very hard to make things strong and stay with the aircraft.
Historically when a mast fails the rotors will "walk" through the cabin and kill the occupants,.....not "save" them.
...
Can you explain how I may be wrong or what I seem to be missing?

Without exact explanation re: under which loads mast was designed to left the rest and how one can know this limit it just looks what it most likely is: non clever attempt to use this tale as a cover from those unhappy customers who had their masts failed (and those who will soon).

C. Beaty
10-25-2012, 08:30 PM
I can recall smashing 4 sets of rotors; 2 Bensen metal, 1 Hughes 269 and 1 Hughes OH-6.

In no case did a mast break nor did I so much as scratch a finger. None had holes near mast center.

BEN S
10-25-2012, 08:43 PM
Jon, as you are well aware, I flipped my machine completely upside down before impact and had to release my harness and drop 3 feet to the deck. I do not have any doubt that had my mast broken off I would have been crushed. But I don't have a monoquoque shell protecting me.
Not sure if I would feel comfortable knowing it was designed to break.

PTKay
10-26-2012, 12:51 AM
The problem of the Xenon braking mast has been addressed by Aviation Artur Trendak
in their ZEN1 already half a year ago. Any earlier attempts to radically solve the probem
were blocked by Raphael Celier, sticking firmly to his faulty design.

I reported about it already in February:

http://www.rotaryforum.com/forum/showthread.php?p=463412#post463412

A group of highly skilled and experience aeronautical engineers
had a look at the original solution and came up with a fix.

It is based on using a car suspension "silent block"
to accommodate and isolate the mast vibrations
from the rigid monocoque cabin structure.

This also should eliminate flexing cyclic moments an the mast
and possible fatigue cracks observed by the earlier design.

This is a radical solution to the known problem, solved before
by simple strengthening plates on the standard mast.

http://www.rotaryforum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=99309&d=1351240435

You can see in the top right corner of the image the strengthened mast and
the elastic fixing in the middle of the mast.

The machine presented in the image has been delivered to a customer in Turkey
and is flying without any incident.
TC-UZZ - Zen1 model delivered 2012 - metallic pink. (Thanks for the pic, Steve_UK.)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--QKK0oa6g_I/UFX5xd_0_4I/AAAAAAAAChw/wVmnoZSBbTw/s1600/blogTC-UZZ_2012.jpg

PTKay
10-26-2012, 01:06 AM
The tests of the ZEN1 mast were undertaken by the Institute of Aviation
team working on their new project, the I-28 tractor gyroplane.

http://www.rotaryforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=34125

The mast they use is supplied by Aviation Artur Trendak.

The big obstacle was also the demand to test the mast
and mast fixing fr 3,5G load, but not only vertically,
but also in pitch and roll loads.

It didn't help to explain to ULC, that gyrocopter rotor will never
a load greater than 2G before stalling the blades, they
used the FW norm which requires 3.5G proof.
Their argument for the sideways test was, that it is necessary
to simulate sudden pitch and roll control inputs as well.

The additional benefactor of these tests is the ZEN1 new g3 version,
using the same mast construction and fixing.

It remains to be discussed, if such loads will ever occur, but what ULC
demands will certainly result in much stronger and better mast.

The new ZEN1 G3 with the new mast is undergoing the certification
by ULC (Polish FAA) and should be available soon.

Enclosed: flight testing of the new mast.

PTKay
10-26-2012, 01:12 AM
http://www.sunlive.co.nz/assets/images/site/Gyrocrash5.jpg

In this image the broken mast can be seen lying directly over the pilots head,
if the blades were still turning, they would smash through the windscreen.

The rotor remains attached on the rest of the mast and the control rod,
it didn't "fly away", so following Jon, Alex and others question:

what's the point for this feature, other then risking the failure in flight?

WaspAir
10-26-2012, 10:30 AM
But I don't have a monoquoque shell protecting me.

The monocoque nature of the shell doesn't inherently make it any safer, stronger, or more energy absorbing than other construction styles. I wondered a bit why it was hyped so much in the opening message of this thread. It's not a new feature in gyros (the 18A cockpit is monocoque, built in 1965), and by itself it doesn't offer any higher level of safety. Tube frames can provide equal or better protection.